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What Are Anti-Reflective Lens Coatings?

When ordering a new pair of glasses your optometrist will ask whether you want to customize your lenses. One of the most popular options: anti-reflective (AR) lens coatings that reduce glare.

Below, we’ll explain how AR coatings work and why they’re so favored.

What Are Anti-Reflective Lens Coatings?

AR coatings are lens enhancements that reduce glare from the front and back surfaces of each lens. They help to improve how light is transmitted through the lens, and into your eye. Most anti-reflective coatings allow 99.5% of light to pass through the lens, compared to 92% with regular lenses.

This specialized coating is a microscopic layer of metal oxides that neutralize reflections.

What Are Some Benefits of AR Coatings?

Lenses without AR coatings have visible glare, which means that light is being reflected off of their surfaces, reducing the amount of light passing through the lens. This can impair the clarity and contrast of your vision, especially at night.

Driving at night becomes much easier when you have AR coatings on your glasses. The halos around vehicle lights are greatly diminished.

AR coatings can also reduce eye fatigue and certain symptoms of digital eye strain. Because your eyes receive more light, they don’t have to work as hard to capture a clear image.

Another benefit of AR coatings: they improve the appearance of your glasses and your eyes. Whoever is looking at you won’t be distracted by reflections and glare bouncing off your glasses. Instead, they’ll have a clear view of your eyes, allowing for better eye contact.

Anti-reflective coatings can be applied to regular eyeglasses as well as sunglasses, for optimal clarity throughout your day.

If you think AR coatings are right for you, we can help! To schedule an appointment, call Palmer N. Lee, O.D. in Citrus Heights, Gold River, Rocklin, Folsom, and Sacramento today.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

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How to Choose the Right Lenses for Your Glasses

Buying glasses is no easy task because there are so many elements to consider. Not everyone has the time to research eyeglass lens materials, designs and coatings.

To make it easier, we’ve compiled a list of different lenses and coatings that offer the best features for your needs.

Types of Lenses and Coatings

Glass lenses

All eyeglass lenses used to be made from glass. Although they offer excellent optics, they’re heavy and can easily crack and break, which can cause harm to the eye. This is why it is very rare to come across such lenses nowadays.

Plastic lenses

Lenses for eyeglasses moved from glass to plastic in the early 1980s as lightweight plastic eyeglass lenses (CR-39) weigh half of what glass lenses weighs, cost less, and possess exceptional optics.

Polycarbonate lenses

Originally these types of lenses were used for safety glasses. Later on, they were used for regular glasses. Polycarbonate is lighter and significantly more impact-resistant than CR-39 plastic, making it a preferred material for children’s eyewear, safety glasses and sports eyewear.

Trivex lenses

Trivex is a urethane-based pre-polymer. It is a newer lightweight eyeglass lens material that is a stronger, more resistant, clearer alternative to standard polycarbonate.

High-index plastic lenses

In response to the demand for thinner, lighter eyeglasses, a number of lens manufacturers have introduced high-index plastic lenses. These lenses are thinner and lighter than other plastic lenses (CR-39) because they have a higher index of refraction and may also have a lower specific gravity.

Anti-scratch coating

Most of today’s modern anti-scratch coatings (also called permagard or hard coats) can make your eyeglass lenses nearly as scratch-resistant as glass.

Anti-reflective coating

Anti-reflective (AR) coating eliminates reflections in lenses that reduce contrast and clarity, especially at night. AR-coated lenses are also much less likely to have glare spots in photographs.

UV-blocking treatment

Cumulative exposure to the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation over a person’s lifetime has been associated with age-related eye problems including cataracts and macular degeneration.

Thankfully, polycarbonate and nearly all high-index plastic lenses have 100 percent UV protection built-in, due to the absorptive characteristics of the lens material.

But if you choose CR-39 plastic lenses, be aware that these lenses need an added coating applied to provide equal UV protection afforded by other lens materials.

Photochromic treatment

This lens treatment enables eyeglass lenses to darken automatically in response to the sun’s UV and high-energy visible (HEV) light rays, and then quickly return to clear (or nearly clear) when indoors. Photochromic lenses are available in virtually all lens materials and designs.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

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Prescription Reading Glasses vs. Over-the-Counter Readers

Can cheap reading glasses harm your eyes?

Picking up a pair of reading glasses from the drugstore rack is common practice. It’s a quick, effortless solution for buying readers. However, over-the-counter readers may not be precisely what your eyes need. Our eye doctors in Citrus Heights, Gold River, Rocklin, Folsom and Sacramento explain the differences between these readers and prescription reading glasses from our optical stores.

The power of prescription lenses

Drugstore reading glasses are available in various strengths, also known as powers, and both lenses in the frames come in the same power. Typically, you’ll find them in ranges from +0.75 to +4.00. However, if you have astigmatism or any vision condition, these readers won’t address it. Prescription reading glasses from our optical are crafted to satisfy your complete visual requirements.

PD – Pupillary distance

PD is the distance measured from the center of one pupil to the other, and it determines the optical center of each lens. Over-the-counter readers are made with an average PD of 60-63mm, but not everyone’s measurement falls within these parameters. Reading from glasses with an incorrect PD can affect vision quality, leading to headaches, double vision and eyestrain.

Prescription glasses offer more value

Prescription glasses can come with anti-reflective coatings to reduce the amount of light that reflects off your lenses, improving vision and decreasing eyestrain – especially in artificial light. We also provide coatings that prevent dirt, oil and water from adhering to the lenses, so they’re easier to clean.

Nowadays, many people do the bulk of their reading from a computer, tablet or phone. Consequently, our eyes are constantly bombarded with unnatural blue light that can cause eye fatigue, dry eye, disrupted sleep and fuzzy vision. That’s why our prescription reading glasses can be purchased with built-in blue light protection.

Like all things in life, you get what you pay for. OTC reading glasses may be cheaper, but they don’t come with the precision and lens coatings that we provide at our Citrus Heights, Gold River, Rocklin, Folsom and Sacramento eye care centers.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

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What Sunglasses Tint is Right for You?

Hints about tints to boost your sports vision

People tend to view sunglasses as a fashion accessory for the summer, along with being a way to safeguard eyes against UV rays. Yet, your designer frames can add much more to your life. Depending on the tint of the lenses, sunglasses can also enhance or distort colors. This gives them the ability to sharpen your sight in certain situations, which is particularly valuable for sports vision.

How do you know which sunglasses tint will work best for your lifestyle? When you choose a pair of designer frames from one of our optical stores in Citrus Heights, Gold River, Rocklin, Folsom and Sacramento, our eye care staff will discuss your daily needs – such as the type of activities you do that require crisp sports vision, and how do you spend your summer – in order to select the right tinted lenses for your sunglasses.

Each tint filters light differently

Here’s our eye doctor’s helpful guide for choosing sunglasses:

  • Gray – A popular neutral tint that enables you to perceive pure colors. Gray tints diminish glare and brightness on a sunny summer day. They’re good for running, golf and biking, and they provide clear vision for driving.
  • Yellow/Orange – These colors are great at increasing contrast in low-light or hazy conditions, however, they can also distort colors. Yellow shades can be ideal for snow activities and indoor ball sports.
  • Green – Green tints reduce glare, filter blue light, and provide visual sharpness with high contrast. When playing precision sports, such as baseball, tennis or golf, green tints can upgrade your sports vision.
  • Amber/Brown – Both of these tints block blue light and lower glare, so they can brighten your vision on cloudy days. Because they block blue light, they also sharpen contrast and visual acuity, especially against green and blue backgrounds – such as grass and sky. They’re a good match for fishing, golf, hunting, baseball, water sports, and cycling.
  • Rose/Red – A red-tinted lens can enhance contrast for partly cloudy conditions. It also allows you to see well while riding or jogging under shady trees in dim light.
  • Purple – Purple provides contrast against green backgrounds, which is especially useful for tennis or golf.

Tints for prescription lenses

If you require prescription lenses to see clearly, tinted lenses are not a problem. At our eye care centers in Citrus Heights, Gold River, Rocklin, Folsom and Sacramento, we craft sunglasses with a wide range of tints and protection against UV rays for all vision prescriptions.

To discuss which tint is best for your sports vision needs, stop in to consult with our experienced staff at EYEcenter Optometric – your expert eye care center near me. In addition to tinted lenses, we also offer photochromic Transitions lenses and a variety of optional lens coatings.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

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Old Frames with New Lenses, or New Designer Frames? What to Buy?

See the pros and cons of both optical options

When your vision prescription changes, you’ll need new eyeglasses lenses. Most patients are excited to choose a new pair of designer frames from our trending optical collections in Citrus Heights and Gold River, California . However, some customers question whether they can just fit new lenses into their old frames. What’s the bottom line?

In general, it’s best to buy new frames, because using old frames can lead to a range of problems. Here’s a rundown of the reasons we don’t usually recommend fitting new lenses into old frames:

Pros of buying new designer frames

  • Old frames must be heated to take out the old lenses, and then they are reheated to insert the new lenses. This process ages the frames and increases their risk of cracking, splitting, or breaking.
  • You won’t ever be without a pair of glasses while you send your old frames for refitting
  • Most optical stores offer a deal when you buy a new frame at the same time as your new lenses
  • You can leave your old frames as a spare pair
  • Buying new designer frames reduces the chances of frame breakage after a few months
  • It’s much easier to adjust new frames when they bend out of shape or feel uncomfortable on your face
  • If any eyeglass parts break, it’s much easier to find replacement parts for new designer frames
  • You get to update your style

Cons of buying new frames

  • It can be more costly
  • If you’re attached to the look of your old frames, you’ll need to adjust to your new appearance

Still not sure what to do? Let us look at your old frames!

If you feel very strongly about using your old frames and reglazing them with a new pair of lenses, please let us look at them to help you make the final decision. Our optical staff will assess the old frames for any corrosion, dry or brittle parts, or loose hinges or screws. We’ll also check to see if your old frames are still in production, so we can order replacement parts if something breaks while putting in the new lenses. Bring your old frames to our optical stores in Gold River and Citrus Heights, California , and we’ll be happy to take a look, as well as show you new options from our high quality selection of designer frames!


At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

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