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How to Choose Eyeglass Frames For Your Features

You’re ready for new glasses. But how do you know which frames will best suit your features?

Some people take pictures of all the pairs they try on and send them to their friends, family or coworkers for feedback. But that’s time consuming and not particularly efficient.

Here’s a better way! Learn what frame features to look to suit the size and shape of your face, as well as your skin tone.

Below are a handful of tips that are sure to help select your frame.

What’s Your Face Shape?

The secret to finding your perfect frames is choosing a pair that best suits your face shape.

You see, our features vaguely resemble particular geometric shapes.

For example:

  • Heart-shaped faces have a narrow chin, a wide forehead and cheeks, and are sometimes topped off with a widow’s peak hairline
  • Round faces have full cheeks, a more rounded hairline and chin, and are similar in width and length
  • Oval faces are similar to round faces, except longer and thinner
  • Square faces have a strong jawline and forehead, and are roughly equal in width and length

So a pair of rectangular frames on a square face will further emphasize the squareness, but rounder glasses can help soften those angles. Rectangular frames are best suited for an oval or round face.

If you don’t already know your face shape, just look in the mirror, close one eye, and draw the outline of your face with a washable marker. The end result should resemble one of the above-mentioned shapes.

Size and Color Matter

Consider the size and color of the frames, along with their shape. They should be the right size for your face—not too big and not too small. This is true for both adults and children.

If you have a cool skin tone, colors to consider for your frames are blue, pink, blue-grey, silver, black, or rose-brown.

If you have warmer skin tones, frame colors like warm blue, off-white, fire-engine red, orange, copper, peach, copper or gold tend to look better.

Looking for Your Ideal Frames? We Can Help!

Want to look great and see clearly? Pop on over and select from a wide range of high-quality designer frames and independent eyewear that match your personal style.

If you need any help, our dedicated optician will happily help you find something that will make you feel confident as ever. Our inclusive selection of sunglasses, eyeglasses, reading glasses, and contact lenses guarantee that you’ll achieve clear and comfortable vision in style.

Contact or visit EYEcenter Optometric in Citrus Heights so we can start looking for the perfect frames for you.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

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Q&A

Frequntly Asked Questions with Palmer N. Lee, O.D.

Q: How do I choose glasses that my child will actually wear?

  • A: When choosing frames for your child, the most important factor is to let them help in the selection process. When children are allowed to choose their glasses frames they will be much more likely to wear them.

Q: How often should I get a new pair of glasses?

    • A: Optometrists recommend updating to new glasses every one to three years as needed.
      If your prescription has changed, you should definitely get a new pair to prevent eye strain and increase comfort.

What Are Anti-Reflective Lens Coatings?

When ordering a new pair of glasses your optometrist will ask whether you want to customize your lenses. One of the most popular options: anti-reflective (AR) lens coatings that reduce glare.

Below, we’ll explain how AR coatings work and why they’re so favored.

What Are Anti-Reflective Lens Coatings?

AR coatings are lens enhancements that reduce glare from the front and back surfaces of each lens. They help to improve how light is transmitted through the lens, and into your eye. Most anti-reflective coatings allow 99.5% of light to pass through the lens, compared to 92% with regular lenses.

This specialized coating is a microscopic layer of metal oxides that neutralize reflections.

What Are Some Benefits of AR Coatings?

Lenses without AR coatings have visible glare, which means that light is being reflected off of their surfaces, reducing the amount of light passing through the lens. This can impair the clarity and contrast of your vision, especially at night.

Driving at night becomes much easier when you have AR coatings on your glasses. The halos around vehicle lights are greatly diminished.

AR coatings can also reduce eye fatigue and certain symptoms of digital eye strain. Because your eyes receive more light, they don’t have to work as hard to capture a clear image.

Another benefit of AR coatings: they improve the appearance of your glasses and your eyes. Whoever is looking at you won’t be distracted by reflections and glare bouncing off your glasses. Instead, they’ll have a clear view of your eyes, allowing for better eye contact.

Anti-reflective coatings can be applied to regular eyeglasses as well as sunglasses, for optimal clarity throughout your day.

If you think AR coatings are right for you, we can help! To schedule an appointment, call Palmer N. Lee, O.D. in Citrus Heights, Gold River, Rocklin, Folsom, and Sacramento today.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

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Understanding Eye Refraction

Our eyes need light in order to see. While we do not understand every aspect of light, we do know how it travels. A ray of light can be reflected, deflected, absorbed, or bent. When light travels through a lens or water, its path is refracted or bent. When the light that enters the eye does not focus directly on the retina, it causes a refractive error.

What Are Refractive Errors?

Refractive errors are a type of vision problem that makes it difficult for a person to see clearly. Checking for refractive errors is the primary part of the standard eye exam. They can be treated with the help of prescription eyeglasses, contact lenses, or surgery. There are four main types of refractive errors:

  • Myopia (nearsightedness)
  • Hyperopia (farsightedness)
  • Presbyopia (inability of the lens to focus)
  • Astigmatism (a refractive issue based on the shape of the eyes’ cornea)

How Do The Eyes See?

The eye contains certain structures that contain refractive properties similar to lenses or water, and can bend light rays into a specific point of focus. This is essential for sharp vision.

Most eye refraction occurs when rays of light travel through the curved, clear front surface of the eye (cornea). The eye’s lens then further bends light rays..

The process of vision begins when rays of light reflect off objects and pass through the eye’s optical system. The rays of light are then refracted and focused into a point of sharp focus. For clear vision, the focus point should be on the retina, the back part of the eye. The retina has nerves to capture the light rays The retinal nerves transmit signals through the optic nerve from the eye to the brain, where they are interpreted.

What Is Eye Refraction?

Eye refraction is how the power for a person’s eyeglasses or contact lenses is calculated. This measurement is based on the curve of the cornea, the lens, and the length of the eye. The optical prescription is determined by the refraction test, also known as a vision test, which is part of your standard eye examination. This refraction allows your eye doctor to provide the eyeglass or contact lens prescription to achieve clear vision.

Eyes change as we age and regular testing helps your eye doctor learn if you need a new prescription. Schedule a refraction test at EYEcenter Optometric in , Gold River, Rocklin, Folsom, Sacramento.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

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How To Prevent Your Lenses From Scratching

If you wear glasses, then you know what a nuisance a scratched lens can be. Scratched or chipped lenses can interfere with your vision, making glasses uncomfortable to wear. Here’s what we recommend to keep your lenses scratch-free.

How to Avoid eScratching Your Lenses

Use a Protective Case

Using a sturdy eyeglass case will prolong the life of your lenses. No matter what kind of glasses you wear — standard, sunglasses, bifocal — you’ll want to protect them.

Be sure to choose a hard case with a soft inner lining and always have one on hand, either in your purse, backpack, or car.

When placing the glasses in their case, make sure the lenses are facing downwards, as this can reduce the risk of them being scratched. Additionally, avoid putting anything else in the case along with the glasses, especially sharp or metal objects.

Choose Anti-Scratch Lenses

Although no lenses are completely scratch-proof, there are certain coatings that can be added to the front and back of your lenses to make them more scratch resistant. Many lenses already come with this option, but sometimes it’s an optional addition. Anti-scratch coatings are particularly helpful for children’s glasses.

Remove Your Glasses Carefully

Handle your glasses by the temples (arms) and not the rims. This way, your fingers avoid the frame and lens area altogether, reducing the chance of inadvertently scratching them. Additionally, holding them by the temples with both hands ensures a better grip, so you’ll be less likely to drop them.

Set Them Down Properly

Never put glasses down with the lenses facing downward, unless it’s into a lens case. If you need to put them down and don’t have a case, rest them with the temples open and upside down — glasses tend to be more stable in this position.

Avoid placing them in a place where they’ll be easily knocked over or splashed on, like near a sink. Setting them down in the same place consistently will also reduce your risk of losing them.

Use the Right Lens Cleaner

It’s all too common for people to wipe their glasses with their clothing or other abrasive material. Doing so can scratch the lenses, especially if they’re dry.

Always clean your lenses with a soft microfiber cloth and specialized lens cleaning solution, items your optometrist’s office can provide.

When to Visit Your Optometrist

Unfortunately, it’s impossible to completely prevent your lenses from ever becoming scratched over their lifetime. Once they are scratched, there is little that can be done to repair the lenses. Most of the time the lenses need to be replaced.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we offer a wide array of frames and lenses, so you’re sure to find a pair to suit your eyes and needs.

Call EYEcenter Optometric in to schedule your eye exam or with any further questions.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Herring

Q: Can you request lenses made from glass? Is glass still used for lenses?

  • A: Yes. Opticians still sometimes use glass for lenses. However, glass is not used very often because they aren’t as safe. If these glass lenses breaks, they can shatters into many pieces and can injure the eye. Glass lenses are much heavier than plastic lenses, so they can make your eyeglasses less comfortable to wear.

Q: Can a coating be added to eyeglasses to protect them from further scratches?

  • A: A protective coating can’t be added to a lens after it’s scratched. The coating is applied when the lens is manufactured and can’t be put on later.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Sacramento, California. Visit EYEcenter optometric for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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REFERENCES

https://www.southparkoptical.com/how-to-avoid-scratches-on-your-glasses

https://www.allaboutvision.com/eyeglasses/how-to-clean-glasses.htm#:~:text=To%20avoid%20scratches%2C%20blow%20any,you%20clean%20the%20cloths%20frequently

https://www.healthline.com/health/how-to-remove-scratches-from-glasses

Eyeglasses for the Color Blind

One in every 12 men and one in every 200 women has some degree of color blindness, also called color vision deficiency. The condition is not actual blindness, but rather an inability or decreased ability to see color and perceive differences in color. Color vision deficiency can be a partial or total deficiency, although total color blindness is not as common.

What Are the Types of Color Blindness?

There are two main types of color blindness:

  • Red-green – which is the most common type of color blindness, and is often inherited from the mother’s side on the X chromosome
  • Blue-yellow – which is rarer, and usually occurs from damage to the optic nerve or retina

In both of these types, the two colors are confused, as both are seen as grey-brown instead of the true colors. Color blindness can also result from disease, brain injury, and certain drug reactions.

What Are Color-Blind Glasses?

Color-blind glasses are eyeglasses with lenses that have special filters that may help a person with color blindness see specific colors more accurately.

They are made with certain materials to absorb and filter out some of the wavelengths between the green and red colors that confuse the brain. When wearing the glasses, some of the light coming through is blocked so that the remaining red and green light wavelengths don’t overlap as much. With less color overlap, the brain gets a clearer signal to help distinguish between the colors.

While there is no cure for color-blindness, color-blind glasses may give people who are color-blind an opportunity to see the world more accurately and experience a greater spectrum of colors while wearing the glasses. The positive effects of the glasses only last as long as they are being worn.

Color-blind glasses can improve the quality of life for people who experience color deficiency and provide a deeper vibrancy and greater array of color schemes.

Because each type of color blindness is unique, the effectiveness of color-blind glasses varies from patient to patient. Most of the color blind glasses available are designed to correct mild red-green color-blindness, leaving fewer options for those who experience severe red-green color blindness, or the blue-yellow type of the condition.

Contact LOCATION to learn more about color-blind glasses so you can experience the world in a more colorful way.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

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Why You Should Trust Your Optical Over Online Stores

We won’t argue with you – online shopping can be very easy and convenient. Without budging from the sofa, you can browse a variety of eyeglasses and click to buy. But plenty of risks lurk in every purchase you make from an online optical! Let’s compare the dangers and disadvantages of choosing new frames from a website versus the benefits of buying eyeglasses from our reliable optical in Citrus Heights and Folsom.

Cons of Buying Eyeglasses Online

  • The whole shopping experience is impersonal. No caring optician or eye care staff will listen to your visual requirements and lifestyle preferences to recommend the best, most reliable eyeglasses options.
  • You can’t ask an optician for a first-hand opinion of how you look
  • There’s no eye doctor to check that the fit of your frames is optimal; you’re on your own, left guessing about the right bridge span or pupillary distance.
  • Many optical stores have special deals with eyeglasses manufacturers, which enables you to receive rebates and discounts that are only available locally. Often, this makes your final cost less expensive.
  • Not all optical websites accept vision insurance.
  • Many studies show that over 50% of eyeglasses bought online were crafted with the wrong prescription or fit.

Pros of Purchasing Eyeglasses from Our Optical in Citrus Heights and Folsom

In our friendly local office, we strive to fulfill each customer’s vision needs, eye health requirements and sense of style. Even if your frames become your most favorite fashion accessory, they still need to give you sharp and comfortable vision. Our optical staff will assess your vision in your new eyeglasses, as well as how they fit on your face. Our goal is not simply to make a sale – it is to ensure that your new eyewear flatters your appearance and maximizes your clear and healthy eyesight.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

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Fit & Fog: A Guide for Glasses and Mask Wear

As we all don masks amidst the pandemic, more than just your nose and mouth can be obstructed. Fog caused by your breath escaping your mask causes unwanted fog on your eyewear too. The AARP offers these tips to avoid this annoying side effect.

As more Americans don face masks to venture outside during the COVID-19 pandemic, many of those who wear glasses are finding that their lenses fog up. It’s a problem that bespectacled surgeons, as well as goggle-wearing skiers, have long experienced.

Why does it happen? In a 1996 article in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, Tom Margrain, a professor at Cardiff University’s School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, explained that in general “when a spectacle wearer enters a warm environment after having been in a cooler one, his/her spectacles may ‘mist up’ due to the formation of condensation on the lens surface.” He went on to say that polycarbonate lenses demisted more rapidly than those made of glass.

With that in mind, if your eyeglasses are fogging when you put on a face mask, it’s because warm, moist air you exhale is being directed up to your glasses. To stop the fogging, you need to block your breath from reaching the surfaces of your lenses.

The Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England published an article in 2011 that offered a simple method to prevent fogging, suggesting that, just before wearing a face mask, people wash their spectacles with soapy water, shake off the excess and then allow the lenses to air-dry.

“Washing the spectacles with soapy water leaves behind a thin surfactant film that reduces this surface tension and causes the water molecules to spread out evenly into a transparent layer,” the article reveals. “This ‘surfactant effect’ is widely utilised to prevent misting of surfaces in many everyday situations.” Antifogging solutions used for scuba masks or ski goggles also accomplish this.

Another tactic is to consider the fit of your face mask, to prevent your exhaled breath from reaching your glasses. An easy hack is to place a folded tissue between your mouth and the mask. The tissue will absorb the warm, moist air, preventing it from reaching your glasses. Also, make sure the top of your mask is tight and the bottom looser, to help direct your exhaled breath away from your eyes.

If you are using a surgical mask with ties, a 2014 article in the Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England advises going against your instincts. Tie the mask crisscross so that the top ties come below your ears and the bottom ties go above. It will make for a tighter fit.

shutterstock 1812597541

Don’t touch your face! Wiping fog from glasses with your fingers could lead to more dirt, germs, and smudges on your lenses. Read the tips below to keep fog away.

Click here for more information or you can read the full article at https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2020/eyewear-face-masks.html?cmp=SNO-ICM-FB-HLTH&socialid=3674304838.

Prescription Reading Glasses vs. Over-the-Counter Readers

Can cheap reading glasses harm your eyes?

Picking up a pair of reading glasses from the drugstore rack is common practice. It’s a quick, effortless solution for buying readers. However, over-the-counter readers may not be precisely what your eyes need. Our eye doctors in Citrus Heights, Gold River, Rocklin, Folsom and Sacramento explain the differences between these readers and prescription reading glasses from our optical stores.

The power of prescription lenses

Drugstore reading glasses are available in various strengths, also known as powers, and both lenses in the frames come in the same power. Typically, you’ll find them in ranges from +0.75 to +4.00. However, if you have astigmatism or any vision condition, these readers won’t address it. Prescription reading glasses from our optical are crafted to satisfy your complete visual requirements.

PD – Pupillary distance

PD is the distance measured from the center of one pupil to the other, and it determines the optical center of each lens. Over-the-counter readers are made with an average PD of 60-63mm, but not everyone’s measurement falls within these parameters. Reading from glasses with an incorrect PD can affect vision quality, leading to headaches, double vision and eyestrain.

Prescription glasses offer more value

Prescription glasses can come with anti-reflective coatings to reduce the amount of light that reflects off your lenses, improving vision and decreasing eyestrain – especially in artificial light. We also provide coatings that prevent dirt, oil and water from adhering to the lenses, so they’re easier to clean.

Nowadays, many people do the bulk of their reading from a computer, tablet or phone. Consequently, our eyes are constantly bombarded with unnatural blue light that can cause eye fatigue, dry eye, disrupted sleep and fuzzy vision. That’s why our prescription reading glasses can be purchased with built-in blue light protection.

Like all things in life, you get what you pay for. OTC reading glasses may be cheaper, but they don’t come with the precision and lens coatings that we provide at our Citrus Heights, Gold River, Rocklin, Folsom and Sacramento eye care centers.

At EYEcenter Optometric, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 916-727-6518 or book an appointment online to see one of our Citrus Heights eye doctors.

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How To Prevent “Mask Fog” on Your Glasses

If you wear glasses and a face mask, you’ve probably struggled with “mask fog.”  Your lenses get all misty, requiring you to wipe your eyewear throughout the day. Below are a few strategies to help you prevent your eyeglasses from fogging up when wearing a mask.

But First, Why Do Glasses Fog Up? 

Quite simply, condensation forms whenever moist warm air hits a cool surface. Your specs fog up when the mask directs your warm breath upward instead of in front of you — which is great for preventing virus transmission but bad for anyone with less-than-stellar eyesight.

Is Your Mask Well Fitted? 

The mask should fit securely over your nose. Ideally, you’ll want to wear a mask with a nose bridge or one that can be shaped or molded to your face. When the mask fits properly, hopefully most of your breath will go through it, not out the top or sides.

Use Your Glasses To Seal the Top of Your Mask

This method works best with large, thick eyewear frames. By pulling your mask up higher on your nose and placing the lower part of your eyeglasses on the mask, you can get a snug fit that blocks your warm breath from escaping upward toward your eyewear.

Tape Your Mask to Your Face

You can always use tape to secure your mask across the bridge of your nose and the top of your cheeks. Use easy-to-remove tape, including adhesive, medical, or athletic. Just be  sure to stay away from duct tape. 

Soap and Water Help Prevent Fogging

This trick is one that healthcare professionals regularly turn to. All you need for this hack is soapy water (dish soap works best) and a microfiber cloth. Stay away from soaps with lotions in them as they can leave a thick residue, making it even harder to see.

Simply rub both sides of your lenses with a drop of soap, then buff the lenses with a soft microfiber cloth. This effective trick helps prevent your lenses from fogging up as a transparent, thin film of soap acts as a barrier. 

Anti-Fog Wipes and Sprays 

Another option is to purchase wipes and sprays designed to tackle foggy lenses. Read the fine print, as certain anti-fog solutions may not work as well, or may even damage lenses with  coatings that minimize glare and fingerprint smudges, for example. 

 

To learn more about ways to keep your glasses from fogging while wearing a mask, contact EYEcenter Optometric in Citrus Heights today.

 

6 Signs You May Need Glasses

Many people don’t realize they have a vision problem. Perhaps they’ve gone years without glasses and haven’t noticed the gradual change in their vision. Or they’ve noticed a change, but put off a visit to an eye doctor. Regardless of whether you’re experiencing problems, make an appointment with Palmer N. Lee, O.D. to maintain your eye health. 

 

There are many clues that your eyesight needs correcting, such as struggling to read up close, or having trouble seeing street signs, or barely deciphering faces while watching a film. If you’re still not sure you need glasses, consider these 6 questions. 

 

Are You Frequently Squinting and/or Experiencing Headaches? 

 

Unless it’s unusually bright, there’s no reason to be squinting if your vision is clear. Although squinting may briefly enhance your eyes’ ability to focus, if done for too long it can tax your  eyes and surrounding muscles, which can result in frequent headaches. 

 

If you have to squint while working on your computer or using digital devices, you may be experiencing not only headaches but also digital eye strain or computer vision syndrome. The cure is often a pair of computer glasses, or blue light glasses, which are designed to block out or filter blue light. This can reduce headaches and squinting when using your digital devices. 

 

Are You Struggling to See Up Close? 

 

If the texts on your phone or restaurant menu look blurry, you may be farsighted. While reading glasses are a great option for near tasks, you’ll need to take them off for other activities.  Consider getting progressive lenses, which change gradually from point to point on the lens, providing the exact lens power needed for seeing objects clearly at any distance. Progressive lenses help you comfortably see near, far, and in-between all day long. 

 

Do You Struggle to See Things at a Distance?  

 

If you’re having difficulty seeing objects at a distance, you may be myopic (nearsighted).  Myopia is the most common cause of impaired vision in children and young adults. Consider a pair of glasses with high-index lenses, which are thinner and lighter than other lenses, along with anti-reflective coating. 

 

Do You Have Blurred Vision at Night?  

 

Are objects or signs more blurry at night? Do you experience halos or glare around lights while driving at night? These may be symptoms of a vision issue, such as myopia — though they can also be attributed to more serious ocular conditions, such as cataracts and glaucoma. To know the cause, get your eyes properly evaluated by Palmer N. Lee, O.D.. 

 

If determined that it is indeed myopia, consider getting prescription glasses with anti-glare or anti-reflective (AR) coating, as they allow more light in and also cut down on glare. This can dramatically improve night vision and help you see more clearly when driving at night. 

 

Are You Experiencing Double Vision?

 

If you’ve been experiencing double vision, contact Palmer N. Lee, O.D., who will get to the root of the problem and provide you with a diagnosis. Double vision may be due to crossed eyes (strabismus), or a corneal irregularity, such as keratoconus, or another medical condition.

 

If you are diagnosed with any of these, you’ll likely need a pair of glasses with a prism correction that helps correct alignment issues. Special lenses prevent you from seeing double by combining two images into a single one.

 

However, note that if you experience sudden double vision, it may be a medical emergency that should be checked by an eye doctor immediately.

 

Are You Losing Your Place or Using Your Finger When Reading? 

 

If you’re frequently losing your spot or skipping lines when reading, you may have a vision problem. This could be due to strabismus, lazy eye, or astigmatism. 

 

The Importance of Regular Eye Exams

 

If you’re experiencing any of the symptoms listed above, it is essential to have a highly qualified optometrist examine your eyes to assess your vision and check for any eye diseases — and to do so as soon as possible. This is the only way to determine whether you need glasses or if something else is causing the problem. 

 

Even if you’re not experiencing any symptoms, it’s important to routinely get your eyes checked. Many eye diseases can be effectively treated before you notice major problems, so regular eye exams are important to maintain eye health. Contact EYEcenter Optometric in Citrus Heights to make an appointment with Palmer N. Lee, O.D.. The sooner you get your vision checked, the faster you’ll be able to see clearly and enjoy a higher quality of life. 

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